Are You a Legal Professional?

Smog Laws by State

Most states require motorists to have the emission levels of their vehicles tested to ensure that pollution levels stay below a predetermined threshold. These statutes, often referred to as "smog laws," typically have exceptions for antique cars or those that are relatively new. In states that have such requirements, motorists must show proof (or have it sent in by the mechanic) that their vehicle is compliant with the law before a license and registration may be renewed.  

Smog Testing: Overview

Every state has its own process and standards for what is considered an acceptable level of pollution from a vehicle, but sometimes these regulations pertain only to dense urban areas. For instance, Missouri's emissions standards and inspection requirements pertain only to those living in the St. Louis Metropolitan Area. Also, certain vehicles are usually exempt. Antique vehicles are one example, since they were engineered before it was possible to build cleaner and more efficient engines. Newer cars also are typically exempt, since manufactures are required to meet current standards anyway. 

Emissions from the transportation sector represented 26 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions in 2014, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), making it the second-highest emitter of such pollution by industry sector. Electricity generation came in first on the list. But while cars have gotten much more efficient and clean-burning than ever before, the ever-increasing number of vehicles on the road has kept these levels high.

State Smog Laws

Links to state emissions testing regulations are listed below:

Alabama

None

Alaska

None

Arizona

Vehicle Emissions

Arkansas

None

California

Smog Information

Colorado

General Emissions Inspection Requirements and Information

Connecticut

Connecticut Emissions Program

Delaware

Vehicle Services: Exhaust Emission Inspection

District of Columbia

D.C. DMV Exhaust Emissions Testing

Florida None
Georgia

Georgia Vehicle Emissions Inspection and Maintenance Program

Hawaii

None

Idaho

Idaho Vehicle Emissions Testing

Illinois

Vehicle Emissions Testing Program

Indiana

Vehicle Emissions Testing Program

Iowa None
Kansas None
Kentucky

None

Louisiana

Motor Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance Program

Maine Enhanced Vehicle Inspection and Maintenance
Maryland

Vehicle Emissions Inspection Program

Massachusetts

Massachusetts Vehicle Check

Michigan

None

Minnesota

None

Mississippi

None

Missouri

Gateway Vehicle Inspection Program (St. Louis metro area)

Montana None
Nebraska

None

Nevada Nevada Emissions Control Program
New Hampshire Inspections and Emissions
New Jersey

Understanding Inspections and the Emissions Test

New Mexico

Emission Testing

New York

New York State Vehicle Safety/Emissions Inspection Program

North Carolina

Vehicle Emissions and Safety Inspection

North Dakota

None

Ohio

Ohio E-Check Program

Oklahoma

None

Oregon

Department of Environmental Quality Emissions Testing

Pennsylvania

Emissions Inspection Program

Rhode Island

Emissions and Safety Testing

South Carolina

None

South Dakota

None

Tennessee Emissions Testing Information and Station Schedules
Texas

Vehicle Inspection

Utah

Emission Inspections

Vermont Vehicle Emission Control Requirements
Virginia

Emissions Inspections

Washington

Washington State Vehicle Emission Check Program

West Virginia

None

Wisconsin Emission Test
Wyoming None

 

Need Legal Advice for a Smog-Related Offense? Ask a Lawyer

Smog regulations are fairly straight-forward and typically don't require legal action. However, every situation is different and you may find yourself in need of expert advice. Contact a traffic law attorney in your area for more information.

Next Steps
Contact a qualified traffic ticket attorney to help
you get the best result possible.
(e.g., Chicago, IL or 60611)

Help Me Find a Do-It-Yourself Solution